DentalCare Logo

Anomalies of Tooth Structure

Course Number: 651

Dilaceration

Dilaceration, a disturbance in tooth development, generates a sharp angular bend or distinct curvature in the root (Figures 48‑50) or less often, in the crown.5,8-10 While coronal curvatures may be evident clinically, radicular dilacerations are best revealed radiographically. The most commonly involved teeth tend to be mandibular third molars, maxillary second premolars and mandibular second molars with the maxillary premolars demonstrating the greatest incidence.5,9,10 Although most cases are idiopathic (without a known cause) in nature, this alteration can occur as a result of trauma.5,8-10 Injury induced dilaceration usually involves anterior teeth or less frequently occurs secondary to impingement of an adjacent anatomic structure or pathologic entity (Figure 45).10 Usually, dilaceration is not problematic but treatment difficulties may be encountered if endodontic treatment or tooth extraction are necessary.7-10

mPeriapical radiograph of root dilaceration of #4

Figure 48.

Cropped panoramic showing root dilaceration of maxillary and mandibular right second molar roots, teeth #2 and #31.

Periapical radiograph showing dilaceration of the maxillary left second premolar tooth #13 with supernumerary roots.

Figure 49.

Periapical radiograph showing dilaceration of the maxillary left second premolar tooth #13 with supernumerary roots.

Dilaceration of the maxillary left canine tooth #11 from impingement adjacent impacted tooth.

Figure 50.

Periapical radiograph showing root dilaceration of the maxillary left canine tooth #11 from impingement adjacent impacted tooth.